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How To Source Cheap Organic Produce

fertility health Aug 01, 2018

How To Source Cheap Organic Produce

The most common objection I receive when encouraging patients to eat organic produce, is the price. There is no denying the fact that buying fresh, organic produce adds to your total shopping bill. I get this.

Personally, food is always my priority. I would prefer to spend more on quality food and miss out on the latest ‘boyfriend’ jeans. I’m even loving my sister’s hand me downs at the moment 😉

Over the years, I’ve shopped organic at the supermarket, local markets, delivery businesses and LOVE dining out at organic cafes (you can check out my fav’s here). I feel good about spending my dollar where I know it will support the organic industry. More demand leads to greater availability and I trust prices will eventually come down.

Until then, you don’t have to sacrifice your personal luxuries. Try my most favourite way to source organic produce and improve your hormone health, for a cheap price.  Get that green (or not so green) thumb out of your back pocket and create some homegrown goodness you’ll be proud of.

CREATE A SPRING VEGGIE PATCH

I love this time of year. Its warming up and summer is just around the corner. When late September rolls around, the warmth of the soil increases and the perfect conditions for your Spring vegetable patch are born.

I am certainly no gardening expert, but with a bit of time, effort and dedicating a small area of my backyard, I have grown some beauties I’m very proud of 🙂 So far this year I have managed to grow enough myself, to cross off many herbs and veg from my weekly shopping list.

It’s a rewarding experience, watching your babies grow until the exciting moments of harvest. Homegrown produce is also higher in nutrient content and if farmed organically, is free  from toxic chemicals. Not to mention the money you can save on food shopping and the fresh, flavoursome food picked from your backyard to plate, in a matter of minutes!

You can learn about my Autumn veggie favourites here and the best herbs to plant in the cooler months here.

For Spring, it’s time for getting in seeds, or small seedlings that do well in the heat of the summer. I’m impatient and prefer to spend a bit more and start with seedlings, but if you want to gain more for your dollar, and have the time, nurturing the seeds into seedlings is for you.

Heres a simple guide for what to generally plant in Spring:

VEGETABLES

Temperate Zones:

  • Asparagus
  • Artichoke (Globe and Jerusalem)
  • Beetroot
  • Beans (Broad, Bush and French)
  • Brussels Sprouts
  • Capsicum
  • Carrot
  • Cauliflower
  • Celery
  • Chilli
  • Choko
  • Cucumber
  • Eggplant
  • Garlic
  • Kohlrabi
  • Leek
  • Lettuce
  • Parsnip
  • Potato
  • Pumpkin
  • Radish
  • Silverbeet
  • Spinach
  • Spring onion
  • Squash
  • Sweet corn (officially a grain)
  • Sweet potato
  • Swede
  • Tomato

Tropical:

  • Bean (Bush and French)
  • Beetrott
  • Cabbage
  • Capsicum
  • Carrot
  • Cucumber
  • Eggplant
  • Lettuce
  • Pumpkin
  • Radish
  • Silverbeet
  • Spinach
  • Spring onion
  • Squash
  • Sweet corn (officially a grain)
  • Sweet potato
  • Tomato
  • Zucchini

Subtropical:

  • Asparagus
  • Bean (Bush and French)
  • Beetroot
  • Broccoli
  • Cabbage
  • Capsicum
  • Carrot
  • Cucumber
  • Eggplant
  • Lettuce
  • Parsnip
  • Pumpkin
  • Radish
  • Rhubarb
  • Silverbeet
  • Spinach
  • Spring onion
  • Squash
  • Sweet Corn (officially a grain)
  • Sweet potato
  • Tomato
  • Zuchinni

HERBS

  • Anise
  • Basil (a great companion plant for tomatoes)
  • Catmint
  • Chives
  • Chamomile
  • Chicory
  • Dandelion
  • Dill
  • Elder
  • Evening Primrose
  • Fennel
  • Fever few
  • Ginger (from the root)
  • Hyssop
  • Lemongrass (from root stock)
  • Marjoram
  • Mint
  • Nasturtium
  • Oregano
  • Purslane
  • Rosemary (from cuttings)
  • Rue
  • Sage
  • Sorrel
  • Tarragon
  • Thyme

A WORD ON COMPANION PLANTING

To help minimise pests and enhance growth, you can plant your vegetables next door to other herbs and flowers. This is called companion planting.

Here are some tips on what to plant with what:

  • Beetroots: Plant next to onions, lettuce, cabbage, silverbeet, kohlrabi
  • Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage: Plant next to onions, celery, dill, sage, thyme, mint, pennyroyal, rosemary, lavender and beetroot.
  • Celery: Plant next to leek, tomato, cauliflower and cabbage.
  • Garlic: Plant next to roses, raspberry.
  • Leek: Plant next to onion, celery and carrot.
  • Spinach and Silverbeet: Plant next to onion.
  • Tomatoes: Plant aside basil.

SOURCING ORGANIC

If you want 100% assurance your seed and seedlings have been raised without the use of toxic chemicals and fertilisers, you  will need to buy them certified organic. Try these online plants. If you’re in Adelaide, I highly recommend checking out the Seed Sisters at the local Henley Beach and Port Adelaide markets.

PLANT YOUR WAY TO BETTER HEALTH

If you plant seeds and seedlings according to the seasons that suit their growing conditions, you will create bumper vegetable and herb harvests. With a successful harvest, you will also save money and gain fresh, flavoursome, nutrient rich and hormone healthy vegetables and herbs to enjoy and share with your loved ones.

Start by dedicating a day to prepare a patch, source your seeds or seedlings and plant away. Just think of the bonus health benefits of natural exercise and Vitamin D.

Have you started a vegetable or herb patch? I’d love to hear what’s working for you. Comment below!

 

Kasey

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